Quantcast
Skip Navigation LinksHomeNewsUCOL leads the field with new Medical Imaging software

UCOL leads the field with new Medical Imaging software

By UCOL on Monday, 22 May 2017

A photograph of a lady holding a tablet featuring an x-ray

UCOL’s Medical Imaging Technology students have access to the newest x-ray archiving technology before it reaches many New Zealand hospitals and radiology clinics.

UCOL’s Medical Imaging Technology department recently installed its new Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS). PACS is a computer programme used to store and review x-rays, ultrasounds, and other medical imaging files.
 
UCOL has acquired Vue PACS Version 12, developed by Carestream Health. MidCentral Health will be upgrading to Version 12 later this year.
 
The contract UCOL has with Carestream Health ensures that the PACS will be upgraded when a new version is released.
 
Peter Benson, UCOL’s Programme Leader for the Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Imaging Technology), says the new PACS will be a valuable teaching tool.
 
“By using the latest version of this programme here at UCOL, our students will be better prepared for using the system in the hospitals when they are on their clinical placements”.
 
A benefit of the new PACS is that students can access it from home via their own PCs, laptops, tablets, and even smart phones. Previously, students had to print their x-rays if they wanted analyse them away from the classroom.
 
“We can now also store photographic images within the system.  This will be useful for role-play scenarios; students can take a photo with their phone and then upload it into the same system and store it along with their x-rays,” says Mr Benson.
 
The software package also comes with demonstration medical imaging files that will assist students in their learning.
 
The new system has no limit on how many students can access it at once, whereas UCOL’s previous system had a maximum of six.

 

UCOL’s Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Imaging Technology) is a three year programme that combines classroom learning, UCOL lab work, and over 2400 hours of clinical placement work. UCOL is one of only three tertiary institutions in the country that offers an undergraduate Medical Imaging Technology degree.
 
Image above: First year Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Imaging Technology) student Josie Wilcox uses a tablet to view a knee x-ray stored on UCOL’s new Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS).
 
Top